Philosophy

Laboring on [About] Labor Day

[Today, I’m waxing philosophical. If you want to wax along with me, then keep on reading. If not, then please peruse my other posts instead.]

This post, an annual classic, was originally written and published on September 5, 2016, Labor Day in the U.S.

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Originally proposed by union leaders, Labor Day commemorates American workers. Just as unions have mostly outlived their usefulness to all but union leaders, Labor Day has become a day for barbecues, family gatherings, and just plain old fun.

Some claim that there is a thing called “work-life balance.” My opinion is that we have only one life (I’m not betting on reincarnation) and that work is an essential part of it. It’s a main driver in why we’re here. Work gives us a purpose in life.

I’ve often heard people say things akin to “I have four years left,” in reference to the time until they “retire.” I shake my head in wonder, both because it seems to me as if they’re talking about a prison sentence (i.e., four years until parole) and because it seems as if they believe that work is getting in the way of some idealistic “life” that hasn’t yet begun.

I’m certainly not advocating that you work, work, work and have no fun, for what is life without fun. I believe that we should approach work and non-work as building blocks for your day. You not only have to work smarter (do the right thing) but there’s no getting around the fact that you also have to work harder.

I can almost guaranty that your competitors are not just sitting around the pool today, they’re also doing some thinking about how they can snatch away your opportunities. Even if I’m wrong and they’re all floating around on inner tubes, it’s even more of a reason for you to outwork them into the ground.

I took some time off this morning. Now I’m about to get back to work preparing for a meeting. After all, it’s Labor Day.

Comment or contact me if you’d like to discuss this post.

Mark F. Weiss

www.weisspc.com

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Philosophy

Laboring On [About] Labor Day

[Today, I’m waxing philosophical. If you want to wax along with me, then keep on reading. If not, then please peruse my other posts instead.]

I’m writing this today, September 5, 2016, Labor Day here in the U.S.

Originally proposed by union leaders, Labor Day commemorates American workers. Just as unions have mostly outlived their usefulness to all but union leaders, Labor Day has become a day for barbecues, family gatherings, and just plain old fun.

Some claim that there is a thing called “work-life balance.” My opinion is that we have only one life (I’m not betting on reincarnation) and that work is an essential part of it. It’s a main driver in why we’re here. Work gives us a purpose in life.

I’ve often heard people say things akin to “I have four years left,” in reference to the time until they “retire.” I shake my head in wonder, both because it seems to me as if they’re talking about a prison sentence (i.e., four years until parole) and because it seems as if they believe that work is getting in the way of some idealistic “life” that hasn’t yet begun.

I’m certainly not advocating that you work, work, work and have no fun, for what is life without fun. I believe that we should approach work and non-work as building blocks for your day. You not only have to work smarter (do the right thing) but there’s no getting around the fact that you also have to work harder.

I can almost guaranty that your competitors are not just sitting around the pool today, they’re also doing some thinking about how they can snatch away your opportunities. Even if I’m wrong and they’re all floating around on inner tubes, it’s even more of a reason for you to outwork them into the ground.

I took some time off this morning. Now I’m about to get back to work preparing for a meeting. After all, it’s Labor Day.

Comment or contact me if you’d like to discuss this post.

Mark F. Weiss

www.weisspc.com

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Future of Healthcare

Audit Medical Group and Physician-Owned Facility Deals in Light of Tomorrow (and Today)

It was June when I saw it. The boarded-up stores of Main Street, paved red with bricks and lost hope.

As I’ve written before (for example, here) and as you’ve undoubtedly witnessed, medical care is shifting from a hospital and, in many cases, physician office, model to a consumer model. Walk-in clinics in markets and drug stores. Apps bringing nurse practitioners or physicians to one’s door. iPhones as diagnostic equipment.

Yet many medical group governing documents and physician-owned facility agreements contain provisions that are inflexible and destined to be breached (or deemed unenforceable) in light of change. Or, worse, destined to strap down your ability to thrive or even to function.

For example, depending on the entity and its purpose, scheduling provisions, restrictive covenants, and compensation models may be out of tune or stretched to the point of soon being so. Consider a provision that allows a group to determine at which hospital facility a provider will be scheduled during a calendar month, when you now want to schedule her to work at Mark’s Pharmacy or at Mark’s house.

Audit and update your strategies, structures and documents not simply in light of compliance and control, but in terms of focus, flexibility and the future.

No one knows exactly where the road to the future is heading, but the signs indicate that it’s away from where things have been. Do you want to go along for the ride?

Oh, yeah, about Main Street. The highway had bypassed the town.

Comment or contact me if you’d like to discuss this post.

Mark F. Weiss

www.weisspc.com

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